Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘History’ Category

During WWII, Brazil sided with the Allies. Soon, any reference to the Axis powers was prohibited. These were difficult times in Brazil for persons and institutions of German, Italian or Japanese descent.

On the day preceding the São Paulo state championship final, the Verdão was forced to change name, from Palestra Italia to Palmeiras.

On game day, 19 minutes into the second half, Palmeiras were beating São Paulo FC 3 goals to 1. A penalty was marked in Palmeiras’ favour and to general astonishment, the opponent abandoned the pitch, ending the duel and confirming Palmeiras’ championship title.

Poetically, Palestra died a leader and Palmeiras were born a champion. The feat became known as “Arrancada Herócia”, the Heroic Jolt.

This season’s 3rd uniform is dark green, featuring gold details on the sleeves, collar and sides.
.

 

Read Full Post »

Palmeiras today launched the 2nd jersey for the 2017/2018 season, inspired by one of the club’s most iconic achievements: the São Paulo State Championship title of 1942. It will be first used against Cruzeiro, on 9 July, at the Mineirão stadium.

The white jersey sports green, vertical stripes and a badge bearing resemblance to the classic emblem used in 1942. On the back of the jersey, under the neckline, the phrase “and the champion Palmeiras is born”, a reference to the forced name change the club was submitted to in 1942.
.

During WWII, the Brazilian government demanded that clubs and other institutions linked to the Axis countries Italy, Germany and Japan change their names in case they were referring to any of the aforementioned countries. Thus, Palestra Italia, founded in 1914, changed into “Palestra”, keeping only the single word of Greek origin as the club’s name.

The change did not soothe political and sporting pressures. Under the threat of having to forfeit all the club’s assets in addition to being expelled from the championship that they currently led, Palestra had to change their name a second time. The night before the final game of the State championship, scheduled for 20 September 1942, the Palestra board of directors held a heated meeting. Dr. Mario Minervino took the floor and asked club Secretary, Dr. Pascoal W. Byron Giuliano, to note in the minutes: “They don’t want us to be Palestra, so then we shall be Palmeiras – born to be champions.”

The following day, tension flared as Palmeiras played opponent São Paulo Futebol Clube – a club linked to the current political elite of São Paulo which was laying claim to the assets of the former Palestra Italia. Palmeiras were soon winning 3-1 and when a penalty was called in Palmeiras’ favour, SPFC pulled their side off the field, proclaiming the Palmeiras squad “an enemy of the homeland”. With this, Palmeiras were crowned champions.

The new jersey has been very well received by supporters, sales will certainly soar.

Scoppia che la vittoria è nostra!

Read Full Post »

Our supporters have been using the pig since 1986, convinced that Palmeiras’ then director of marketing João Roberto Gobatto had indeed come up with a solution to neutralize frequent smears from rival supporters (read full story here).

The hatcher of the plan has finally received his recognition: before last Sunday’s game against Internacional, Palmeiras officially presented The Pig as the club’s second mascot, baptising it “Gobatto”. Success is a given.
.
mascot01.
Scoppia che la vittoria è nostra!

Read Full Post »

Today, FIFA on social media paid homage to the first intercontinental world club champions, Palmeiras. The announcement, featured on the federation’s Instagram, reads:
.

Green is the colour of envy. ‘The Big Green’ were the envy of the wide world #OnThisDay 65 years ago. A Liminha-inspired @sepalmeiras edged a @juventus team including Giampiero Boniperti & a dazzling Danish triumvirate to become the sport’s first intercontinental world club champions. 100,000 watched that at the Maracanã. One million flooded the streets of São Paulo to welcome their heroes home.

Less informed rival supporters and some malicious journalists have continuously claimed Palmeiras have no world title. Guess this shuts them up for good.

On Sunday, against Atlético Mineiro, the Palmeiras squad will wear a jersey featuring the Brazilian flag hovering above the crest, just like in 1951.  

Scoppia che la vittoria è nostra!
.

 

Read Full Post »

Exactly on this day, 100 years ago, Palmeiras played their first official match. Who could imagine that the little club, created less than two years earlier, would one day become Brazil’s biggest holder of national championship titles?

The Palestra Italia, as the club was known back then, was born on 26 August 1914 by Italian immigrants in São Paulo. In order to attract interest and players, the club went about advertising in the local Fanfulla newspaper, while arranging small, internal tournaments to select the best players. Training sessions followed, then a series of friendlies.

In 1916, the club Scottish Wanderers were kicked out of the “Paulista Association of Athletic Sports” for having divided the income of their matches between players – something forbidden in amateur leagues of the time. Palestra Italia seized the opportunity, grabbing the vacant spot in the championship after having committed to contribute financially to the renovation of a stadium where games were to be played. In addition to the Palestra, the league consisted of São Paulo, Santos, São Bento Athletic Association of Palmeiras, Ypiranga and Mackenzie.

On 13 May 1916, Fabbrini, Grimaldi, Bianco, Ricco, Fabbi II, De Biasi, Gobato, Valle II, Vescovini, Bernardini and Severino drew 1-1 with Mackenzie, Gobato scoring Palestra Italia’s first official goal. Ricco was the captain and Giuseppe Roberti, the coach. The draw against Mackenzie, last year’s runner-up, was considered a good result, Palestra having only a couple of known players in their young squad.
.

palestra_first_flash

Palestra Italia – the first flash

.
Palestra Italia ended the 1916 edition of the São Paulo championship in 6th place, the highlight of the campaign being a 4-2 victory over Santos.

Since that day a century ago, Palmeiras have played another 4.401 official games, according to the always excellent Instituto Palestrino de Estatística blog. Out of these, 2.305 victories and 1.087 draws, corresponding to 61% of points won (if adopting the current standards across the board, where a victory is rewarded three points).

Scoppia che la vittoria è nostra! 

 

Read Full Post »

We all know what Johan Cruyff has meant for modern football and I am not going to ”rain on what’s wet”, as one would say in Brazil. Instead, I will pay homage to one of the very greatest by detailing his one and only encounter with Palmeiras.

ramon_de_carranzaWe are in the city of Cadiz, 1974. As usual, four teams have been invited to play for the prestigious Ramón de Carranza trophy, famous for standing more than 170 cm tall. This year, Barcelona, Espanyol, Santos and Palmeiras are the invited and, as evident from the tournament poster to the right, a clash of titans is expected in the final: Cruyff’s Barcelona against Pelé’s Santos. Recently, the Dutch had magnetized the world with his skill and vision of play in the World Cup, where the Netherland finished runner-up to Germany. No one expects Palmeiras to repeat the feat of 1969, when the Verdão emerged victorious in the Ramón de Carranza´s 15th edition against stiff competition from Real Madrid, Atlético Madrid and Estudiantes from Argentina.

Cruyff´s Barcelona did eventually play Santos, but only for third place: in the first round, Palmeiras eliminated Barcelona 2-0, and Espanyol beat Santos by the same score. The Palmeiras squad, successfully taking out Cruyff, Neeskens and the others, was coached by Osvaldo Brandão and consisted of Leão; Eurico, Luís Pereira, Alfredo and Zeca; Dudu (Edson) and Ademir da Guia; Ronaldo, Leivinha, César and Toninho Vanusa (Edu). No less than six of the Palmeiras players had played in the World Cup that year (Leão, Luís Pereira, Alfredo, Ademir da Guia, Leivinha e César) and they all put on a splendid performance.

Third place ended up with Barcelona, who overtook Santos 4-1 with two goals by Neeskens. Palmeiras went on winning the whole thing, beating Espanyol 2-1 in the final (enjoy these game highlights).

Johan Cruyff, a legend – as player and coach. Rest in peace.
.
cruyff

Read Full Post »

001_pigcollection_logoGermanic immigrants first arrived in Brazil starting at the beginning of the 1800’s. From 1824 to 1969, a modest estimation is that some 250.000 Germans arrived in Brazil – the fourth largest immigrant community to settle in the country, after the Portuguese, Italians and Spaniards. A majority of them arrived between the I and the II World War.

Early German immigrants settled mostly in rural areas of Brazil, making their living as farmers. Those arriving in the 20th century mostly settled in big towns, being middle-class labourers from urban areas of Germany. During the 1920s and 1930s, Brazil also attracted a significant number of German Jews, who settled mostly in São Paulo.

Many aspects of Brazil’s culture has been influenced by Germans, especially so in the southern states of Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul: the Brazilian Oktoberfest in Blumenau is second only to Munich in size. Roughly 5-10 million Brazilians are believed to have German ancestry and the Germanic influence in Brazil is undeniable, as two of Brazil’s most famous personalities can attest to: architect Oscar Niemeyer and über-model Gisele Bündchen.

With all this “germanification” going on in Brazil for centuries, how come Palmeiras have never played in Germany? Good question! The Verdão have played German teams 8 times (4 victories, 3 draws and 1 defeat) and the list includes heavy-hitters like Werder Bremen and Borussia Dortmund. However, not one clash has taken place on German soil.

Regardless, to all our German readers, near and far: danke schön!
.
05_alemanha_2.
artwork by Custódio Rosa

research by Cláudio of IPE

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: